Hindu devotees, pierced and shackled make their way with their burdens during the colourful annual Thaipusam festival, one of the world’s most extreme displays of religious devotion on January 17, 2014

monumentalblonde:

Can I? - Stick skewers in my skin / and whirl a dervish spin

  1. Camera: Nikon D90
  2. Aperture: f/2
  3. Exposure: 1/2500th
  4. Focal Length: 50mm

Happy Janamashtami

The birthday of Lord Krishna, the original superhero. Legend has it that he was born at midnight on a dark, stormy night in a jail, to end the rule and atrocities of his uncle Kansa. In Maharashtra, the playful side of Krishna’s youthful days and his more mischievous side is celebrated where teams of young men form human pyramids to reach a Handi (clay pot) of buttermilk hanging up high in order to break it spilling the sticky liquid all over themselves! 

Picture: Janmashtami-Dahi Handi by anupama kinagi

Janamashtami | Somewhere in the world today

Happy Raksha Bandan. A day for brotherly and sisterly love…

Raksha Bandhan (meaning bond of protection in many Indian languages) is a Hindu festival, which celebrates the bond between brothers and sisters. Sisters tie a sacred Rakhi thread on the right wrist of their brothers and apply tilak on their foreheads to ensure a long life and happiness.

Read more on Raksha Bandhan (Rakhi Festival)

Fast for the health and happiness of your man!

Karwa Chauth is a festival full of legend and tradition celebrated by all married Hindu women, mostly in Northern India. During the day they fast for the long life, health and prosperity of their husbands. The event is growing bigger with each passing year and nowadays, Karwa Chauth is more for fun than a serious festival.

More on Karwa Chauth Vrat by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture: Karwa Chauth henna by HennaLounge, on Flickr

A Hindu celebration of marriage and family

Women all over India celebrate Teej with great enthusiasm, dressing in their best saris and honouring the other women of the family and their husbands.

More on Hartalika Teej by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture: Teej Festival, Jaipur by Bahadur Singh aus Rajasthan, Indien, on Flickr

Hindu Girl Power…

Women all over India celebrate Teej with great enthusiasm, dressing in their best saris and honouring the other women of the family and their husbands. There are lively street processions with images of the goddess Parvati dressed in new clothes and jewellery and escorted by elephants, camels and horse-drawn chariots.

More on Haryali Teej by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture: Teej Festival, Jaipur by Bahadur Singh aus Rajasthan, Indien, on Flickr.

Get dyed at the Festival of Colours…

The Hindu festival of Holi is also called ‘The Festival of Colours’, and people celebrate the festival by smearing each other with paint, and throwing coloured powder and dye around in an atmosphere of good natured abandon in celebration of springtime.

More on Holi by Somewhere in the world today…

Original tumblr post by just-sittin-eatin-bagels:

Holi, or The Festival of Colors, in India, celebrating the beginning of Spring.

  1. Aperture: f/5.59
  2. Exposure: 1/180th
  3. Focal Length: 24mm

Get ready to Hot-foot it in Singapore

Thimithi (also Theemidhi or Theemithi) is a Hindu firewalking ritual carried out as a religious vow in which the faithful walk across white-hot coals in exchange for a wish or blessing from the goddess Draupadi who was wagered and lost in a game of dice by her husband. The story goes that Draupadi had to prove her innocence and fidelity by walking barefoot over hot coals, and so the firewalking ritual is a form of penance or thanksgiving in her honour.

More on Thimithi (Firewalking) by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture Theemithi Fire Walking Festival by sensibles, on Flickr

(Source: )

Go shopping with mum!

Navratri (literally meaning “nine nights”) is one of the greatest Hindu festivals. It is said that Lord Shiva gave permission to Durga to see her mother for nine days in the year and this festival remembers her visit.  Navaratri is traditionally considered a very good time for starting new ventures, among other things, and going shopping for new clothes…

More on Navrati by Somewhere in the world today…

Picture: Navrati Dance by MJField

Do not look at the moon! The moon laughed at Ganesh when his stomach burst open and lots of sweets fell out!

The story goes that one year on his birthday, Ganesha, being very fond of sweet things, was going from house to house accepting sweet puddings. Having eaten a good few too many, he set out riding upon his mouse when suddenly the mouse being frightened by a snake, stumbled and Ganesha fell off. His stomach burst open and all the sweets came tumbling out. Ganesha stuffed them back into his stomach quickly and, catching hold of the snake, tied it around his belly to hold it all in.

Seeing all this, the moon in the sky laughed heartily. This unseemly behaviour of the moon annoyed Ganesha immensely and so he cursed that no one should look at the moon on the Ganesh Chaturthi day. If anyone does, he will surely earn a bad name, censure or ill-repute.

Food, travel and more on the Hindu festival of Ganesh Chaturthi

Picture: Lalbaug cha Raja 07 _lalbaug Ganesh Utsav Visarajan 07 (14) (by tushark)