Fiery Chinese symbols appear to float above the night sky around Kyoto

This iconic fire festival, marks the end of Obon, the Japanese festival of the dead.

Five fiery torches, each in the shape of a Chinese symbol of special meaning, are lit in turn on the hillsides surrounding Kyoto. It signifies the return to the spirit world of departed ancestors, who are said to visit their living families during O-Bon (or the Bon festival). The flames of the fires are visible from all over Kyoto and all the city lights are turned off to enhance this spectacular festival.

Daimonji Gozan Okuribi | Somewhere in the world today

  1. justabadapple reblogged this from somewhereintheworldtoday
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  11. riseofthefirebird reblogged this from somewhereintheworldtoday
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  13. specialcolorfulshabon reblogged this from kairikin and added:
    Also, that’s not the symbol for “fire” (火); it’s the symbol for “large” or “great” (大).
  14. thatweirdguyon reblogged this from marzgurl
  15. flamingold2 reblogged this from amostjw
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  17. bugeyedetective reblogged this from kairikin and added:
    Isn’t that the symbol for Big? Further research reveals that it’s called the Daimonji, lit Symbol-For-‘Big’. Just...
  18. megazeo reblogged this from marzgurl
  19. retsuyachan reblogged this from kairikin and added:
    Fiery Chinese symbols appear to float above the night sky around Kyoto This iconic fire festival, marks the end of Obon,...
  20. morningstararcana reblogged this from kairikin
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  22. kairikin reblogged this from memoriumactivity and added:
    I understand what you’re saying, but this is still referring to the Japanese festival and the various festivities...
  23. alliseeisthewarpandimgoingmad reblogged this from memoriumactivity
  24. memoriumactivity reblogged this from ninjazaku and added:
    The symbol originates from China, even though it’s widely used in Japan. It’s thus not unreasonable to call it a Chinese...
  25. omegaxzer0 reblogged this from primegundam and added:
    The comments are dumb because Kanji came from China. Nothing was changed. They ARE Chinese characters.